Legs

//Legs

Leg Injuries

We discuss some of the most common leg injuries we treat and how we can help. Leg injuries from torn ligaments to muscle tears. Muscles, tendons, nerves or joints, can be the cause of leg pain, so we’ll look at the different types of structures in the leg and the injuries that comes with it.

Remember that most injuries don’t happen in isolation, in most cases there are two to three structures that’s a problem. Its common to find more than one injury for example: With a twisted knee we find that 2 ligaments are sprained and usually 4 muscle injuries as well as 2 tendon injuries that accompany it.

Our main concern will be to determine which one is the worst or the main problem, and focus our attention there. A general rule of thumb is a hierarchy of importance:

  1. Nerve
  2. Bone
  3. Joint
  4. Disc
  5. Ligament
  6. Tendon
  7. Muscle

Groin Pain

Causes of groin pain in the inner thigh and pelvis, symptoms and exercises that can prevent groin injuries. Distinguish between types of groin pain.

2019-04-07T09:35:57+02:00By |Legs|

Quadriceps tendinitis

A Quadriceps Tendinitis or Tendinopathy: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Physiotherapy treatment and why it heals so slow. Tendinitis of the Quadriceps tendon is a condition when the thigh muscles’s tendon become inflamed and irritated. The quadriceps muscles are four large muscles in the front of the thigh just above the knee cap.

2019-03-22T16:13:43+02:00By |Legs, Pain|

Quadriceps muscle strain (tear)

A Quadriceps muscle stain is a tear of one of the four thigh muscles. Pulling feeling over the quads or a sharp sting as if someone shot you in the front of the thigh. Quad muscle strain: Vastus Medialis, Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Intermedius, Rectus Femoris muscle. Hence the phrase 'pulled quad'.

2019-04-07T09:30:06+02:00By |Legs, Pain|

Hamstring Tendinitis

A Hamstring tendinitis is a condition where one of the 3 hamstring tendons are inflamed due to constant irritation from repetitive overload on the tendon. This occurs either at the hamstring tendons that attach to the buttock (sitting bone) or at one of the two distal tendons that attach at the back of the knee. The hamstring tendons must be able to withstand the pulling force when its suddenly loaded.

2019-04-07T09:29:04+02:00By |Legs, Pain|